We have experienced a Major Electrical Failure at our facility… What Next?

The risk of catastrophic failure to electrical equipment when properly tested, inspected and maintained is minimized. We at OpEX can assist you with establishing a comprehensive electrical equipment maintenance program that will increase the reliability of electrical assets and decrease exposure of employees to electrical hazards. However, even with an excellent electrical equipment maintenance program in place it is still possible for a failure to occur.

Therefore, it is essential emergency repair procedures be documented and available. We have developed emergency repair procedures for many facilities and understand how valuable they are when asking “WHAT NEXT?”.

An example of transformer repair plans A & B are below. Obviously plan A would not be an option if transformer failure was as depicted above.

Details of Transformer Plan A (24 ~ 36 Hours)

  1. As soon as the transformer fails, call electrical testing company to come onsite to test and analyze
    a. Phone number for the on call person is: (1-888-xxx-xxxx)
  2. Complete necessary permits to have electrical contractor isolate and lock out the failed transformer. Obtain all signatures necessary for the permit.
  3. Once all parts of the permit are gathered, electrical contractor to isolate the failed transformer.
  4. Once the transformer is isolated, test company to test and analyze
  5. Test company to share results with owner in order to determine if the transformer can be repaired in place or if it needs to be pulled out of production
  6. If the transformer can be fixed onsite within 24 hours, go to step # 11, otherwise proceed to the next step.
  7. Call crane provider to bring a crane to lift and a flatbed truck to transport the transformers (1 ~ 1.5 Hours)
    a. Phone number for the on call person at crane provider is: 1-888-xxx-xxxx
  8. Once crane is onsite, lift the faulty transformer out and bring the spare in.
  9. Test company to test the spare transformer prior to re-energizing. Tests include but not limited to PI, Winding Resistance, TTR, and Sweep Frequency as time allows.
  10. If the spare transformer does not test to owner’s standard, go to plan B. Otherwise, proceed to the next step.
  11. Electrical contractor to re-terminate the primary side ONLY of the transformer. Isolate all loads.
  12. Complete the electrical work permit, remove all grounds applied, and make sure nothing is left in the switchgear.
  13. Operate the main high voltage disconnect to energize the transformer
  14. If there are no issues, de-energize transformer and reconnect all loads.
  15. Re- Operate the main high voltage disconnect to energize the transformer
  16. Verify correct voltages and all critical loads are energized.

Details of Transformer Plan B (24 ~ 36 Hours)

  1. Complete necessary permit(s) to have electrical contractor de-terminate transformer.
  2. Switch all transformer loads to backup generator. Communicate accordingly with production.
  3. Once all loads are on Backup generator, remove the failed transformer and replace with spare.
  4. Test company to test the transformer once in place to make sure it is safe to energize. Tests include but not limited to PI, Winding Resistance, TTR, and Sweep Frequency as time allows.
  5. Electrical contractor to re-terminate the transformer
  6. Close out Electrical Permit, make sure all grounds are removed and nothing left in switchgear.
  7. Operate the main high voltage disconnect to energize the transformer
  8. Verify correct voltages and all critical loads are energized.